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I Bet These 12 Questions Can Help You Sell More

I’ll bet you: If you answer the 12 questions in this blog post before you write or rewrite the copy (text) for your website and your marketing materials, you will be able to dig out a nugget that will help you sell more of your product…

These 12 questions can probably help your face-to-face sales, too.

The 12 questions in just a tick. First, briefly:

You might’ve learned long ago that the right messages in your marketing and advertising can make a big difference to your sales. But if want a quick reminder, imagine this:

…over a cuppa, a fella is telling you about a tricky little issue he has with his business. You know you have a good solution for this guy. You know that if he feels comfortable with you, he’ll feel good about doing business with you. You know that what you say – and how you say it – will mean money in the bank. Or no money in the bank.

Now I won’t put a price on a lovely cuppa and an enjoyable chat. They’re two of my simple pleasures. But you reading this, and me writing this: I’d say we both know this type of story can simply be about your lost time and expenditure – costs to your business.

…and you know that the messages on your website and in all your advertising and marketing do the same job as the words that come out of your mouth. The difference is, your marketing material can be out talking to lots of people, all at the same time.

A good copywriter is a sales person behind a keyboard. Take on that role as you write your copy.

Oki doke… 12 places for you to dig:

1. Write down any ideas or thoughts on how you can, or how you already do, sell your product

2. In what scenarios do people buy your product? What are the problems or situations?

3. How can your product solve these problems?

  • What does it do for people?
  • Write a list. This is not so much what your product is. It’s about how it helps people.
  • Be thinking about how your product can help people more, or less, than your competitors’.

4. Ok, who is a fairly typical buyer of your product?

  • Think of one person you know.
  • What do they do for a living?
  • Where do they live?
  • Note anything you can think of about their character.
  • What do they enjoy doing?
  • What do they worry about?
  • What problems do they have?
  • Do they want your product so they’ll look better to their colleagues?
  • Do they want it so they can be more efficient?
  • What other things drive them to want your product?
  • If there’s more than one ‘type’ of person, answer these questions for each.
  • And include any other thoughts about them.

5. When someone has read your copy, what do you want them to be thinking? What do you want them to be feeling?

  • Get more specific than ‘Great product.’
  • For example: ‘That’ll make me look pretty good in work.’ Or: ‘Oh, this is actually easier than I thought.’ Or: ‘Oh, I’ll be able to ____.’

6. What do you want people to do when they’ve read your copy?

  • Phone for a quote? Order a box of stuff? Get a free trial? Another thing?

7. Why should they do what you want them to do?

  • List a bunch of things. Things that come from people’s emotional minds. Things based on logic and reason.

Questions 8, 9, 10, 11, and 12…see all 12 questions here.

…and let me know in a comment below, if the post was helpful for you — if it was, I’ll post more stuff.

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